52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks # 21 – Elisha “Eli” Welch

My paternal grandmother’s father’s great-grandfather [3rd great-grandfather] was Elisha “Eli” Welch/Welsh. The earliest records spell the name as Welsh while the more recent records stabilized with the Welch spelling. I don’t know a lot more about him than his name and what few details can be gleaned from a few early census records.

Research and historical family stories indicate he married Jane Blakeney sometime around 1808 probably in Chesterfield County, South Carolina or across the North Carolina border in Anson County, which was the county seat often used by the residents who lived near the state line.

The only census record in which he was listed that contained any details other than his name and the number of people in the household, tallied by gender, was the Fayette County, Alabama 1850 census.1850What I learned from this census record is he was born about 1788 in South Carolina, was a farmer with property valued at $50 and could not read or write. Although relationships were not identified, it is assumed Jane was his wife and there were three probable children living in the household [Sarah, 25; Hugh, 23; and Robert, 21]. The birth location of those probable children in South Carolina provides an indication that Eli was still living in South Carolina in 1829. The 7-year-old and 2-year-old children were likely grandchildren. Alford Blackney [Blakeney], though as yet unidentified, was likely a nephew to Jane.

The 1820 census for Chesterfield County, South Carolina lists the Eli Welch household as containing one male and one female between 26 and 44, one male between 10 and 15, 2 males under 10 and 2 females under 10. Based on Eli’s age in the 1850 census, he would have been approximately 32 in the 1820 census. Based on Eli’s age, the older young male must have been closer to 10 than to 15. If that male were Eli’s child, that would indicate a marriage date of between 1805 and 1810. Although Eli and Jane were married prior to the 1810 census, I have not yet found a listing for him; as a young couple they could have been enumerated within the household of another family.

The 1830 census for Anson, North Carolina [which is just across the border from Chesterfield County, South Carolina] lists the Eli Welch household with 7 sons under 15 [meaning the older son from the 1820 census was not enumerated] and 3 daughters under 15, plus his wife, for a total of 10 or 11 children.

The 1830 and 1840 census records, which record ages within a decade, would indicate Eli was born in the decade from 1790 to 1800 rather than 1780 to 1790. The consistency of those age brackets over two census periods would suggest he was probably born after the census effective date in 1790 rather than 1788 as reflected in the 1850 census.

By the 1840 census, the Eli Welch household was enumerated in Fayette County, Alabama and the once growing family was beginning to reduce in size as the older children began to establish their own households – there were 3 sons between the ages of 15 and 20 and 1 daughter between 10 and 14, plus Eli and Jane.

If Eli left a will it was not available in Fayette County records, but by the time Jane died about 1856 probate files indicated she was widowed and their property was sold and proceeds passed to heirs. That probate file and the 1850 census would indicate Eli died between November 1850 and sometime in 1856. No death or burial records have been discovered thus far.

 

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This blog was prepared as a part of Amy Johnson Crow’s  No Story Too Small 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge.

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52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks #20 – Piety Thomas Smith

Piety Thomas Smith was my maternal 2nd great-grandmother. Piety was born December 9, 1810 in North Carolina. She married Jacob P. Lineberry in Grayson County, Virginia sometime after her marriage bond was recorded on November 4, 1833. Although many researchers list her parents as Wyatt Tansel Smith and Elizabeth Wilkes, Jacob’s marriage bond listed her as the daughter of P. Thomas Smith, although I suppose this could be an erroneous reiteration of her name rather than including the name of her father.

The 1840 Grayson County census for Jacob Lineberry listed one adult male between the ages of 20 and 29 and one adult female between the ages of 30 and 39 plus two male and two female children five years of age – Catherine (1835), Elizabeth (1837), Allen Journal (1838) and Joseph (1840). It is assumed the census enumerator erred in marking the age for Jacob since he was born in 1806 and would have been 34 at the time of the 1840 census, while Piety would have been 30.

The 1850 census lists another five children born to Jacob and Piety during the decade from 1840 to 1850 – Mary (1841), George [my great-grandfather] (1843), Wesley Bird (1845), Jacob (1846) and Martha (1847). Although the specific birth dates we have for Jacob and Martha are as above, the census enumerations for both 1850 and 1860 list Jacob and Martha reversed in age, which means Jacob’s recorded birth date is likely incorrect. 1850 M432_939 Page 378A Jacob & Piety Lineberry (2)The 1860 census adds one more daughter during the decade between 1850 and 1860 – Piety (1856). They also had a son Isiah born in 1850 who died in 1851. Daughters Catherine and Elizabeth both married about 1855 and by the 1860 census, Piety and Jacob were grandparents to four grandsons.

During the Civil War, two of their sons, George and Wesley served in the 29th Virginia Infantry for the duration while Allen Journal served ten days in the Virginia Militia as a part of the Confederate Army. All three sons survived the war.

By the 1870 census, only the youngest daughter, Piety, still lived at home. All the other children were married and raising families. Piety married in 1873. By the 1880 census, Piety and Jacob were enumerated as a couple.

By the time Piety died on October 25, 1885, she and Jacob had 80 grandchildren. Another 20 were born after her death for a total of 100 grandchildren.

IMG_0952 - Piety Thomas Smith Lineberry's HSShe was buried at the Hebron Cemetery in Carroll County, Virginia. Her hand-carved tombstone lists her birth and death dates as well as an inscription, likely carved by Jacob [a close-up photo of the text was posted by Beth Robinette on the FindAGrave memorial]:

As you pass by remember me
As you are now
So once was I
As I am now
You soon will be
Prepare for death and follow me – See more at: http://kbaumantreehouse.name/getperson.php?personID=I296&tree=keithandkay#sthash.yVf4oDnm.dpuf

 As you pass by remember me
As you are now
So once was I
As I am now
You soon will be
Prepare for death and follow

As you pass by remember me
As you are now
So once was I
As I am now
You soon will be
Prepare for death and follow me – See more at: http://kbaumantreehouse.name/getperson.php?personID=I296&tree=keithandkay#sthash.yVf4oDnm.dpuf

 

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This blog was prepared as a part of Amy Johnson Crow’s  No Story Too Small 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge.

 

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks # 19 – Joseph Henry Keithley

Joseph Henry Keithley_editedMy maternal grandmother’s father was Joseph Henry Keithley. He was the son of Enoch Keithley and Amy Turner born in New Diggings, Wisconsin on October 18, 1853. New Diggings was a community established in 1826 when miners were looking for new places to dig for lead and found that area rich in lead deposits. In reading about the early history of that community, I learned that many of the miners had come from Missouri, which was the case with Joseph’s father. While searching for information on New Diggings I found a page of an artist who has done some panorama paintings of the small community. I had posted a picture of the general store (built in 1844), which is included on the artist’s panorama, on the blog I did about Joseph’s father.

When Joseph was 1 1/2 years old, the 1855 Wisconsin census for New Diggings listed the Enoch Keithley family with two males and one female:  1855 WisconsinBy the time of the 1860 census, Joseph was 6 and his family was living in Shullsburg, Wisconsin, which was 7 miles northeast of New Diggings. Joseph now had two siblings – brothers Arthur (4) and Lewis (3):  1860In November 1861 when Joseph was 7 years old, his father enlisted in the Union Army and left for Pittsburg Landing where he died in April 1862. His mother Amy married Thomas Burgess in October 1862 and in January 1864 they had a daughter named Edith “Sarah” Burgess. Unfortunately, Thomas deserted the family and Amy and her three sons and a daughter moved to Fairview, Illinois where her parents and some of her siblings had moved.

The 1870 census enumerates Amy and Edith in one household (52) while Joseph was enumerated as a laborer in another household (108), Lewis in another household (128) and Arthur was enumerated in another county over 50 miles away. These census entries reflect the dire, though not necessarily unusual, circumstance of children having to hire out to other families in order to have a place to live and food to eat.

By the 1880 census, Joseph was listed as head of a household that included his mother and half-sister as well as his two-year-old niece (daughter of Amy’s brother George whose wife had died). Arthur was living in Peoria where he spent the rest of his life, and Lewis was enumerated in Seward County, Nebraska where he was working as a farm laborer and living as a boarder.

Joseph married Martha Ann Conn in Chicago on January 20, 1881. In writing what we know and don’t know about Martha, Kay included their marriage license in a blog. Because we have no information on Martha other than her name, we do not know where or how they met. Their first child, a daughter named Violet Belle, was born November 4, 1881 in Fairview. In 1882, Joseph and Martha purchased a tract of land in the surrounding countryside, presumably to build a home to raise their family and to farm it. On a trip to Fairview in 2008, a local woman drove Kay and me out to see the land they purchased; it is currently vacant farmland. On January 20, 1883, my grandmother, Eva, was born and her brother, Leo, was said to be born November 17, 1883. That date may indicate at least a slightly premature birth for Leo. We have birth certificates for both Violet and Eva but a certificate was not found in Fulton County for Leo; however, his WWI draft registration lists his birth date, although it is not uncommon for WWI draft registrations to be off by a year.

Due to the lack of an 1890 census, details of Joseph’s life from the birth dates of his children to the 1900 census have to be inferred from other pieces of information. Joseph and Martha moved to Missouri between 1884 and 1889 when their last daughter, Mabel was born. Martha died either in childbirth or shortly thereafter. No birth record for Mabel or death record for Martha has as yet been located. The care for Violet, Eva and Leo was apparently taken over by family members but no one stepped up to take on the responsibility of an infant, so Mabel was adopted by Henry and Sarah Whippler. I have found records of them living in a nearby county and of one of their sons living in the town of Carterville, which is where Joseph was living in 1900.

Joseph married Sarah Oliver in Carthage, Missouri on October 6, 1892. Their son, Arthur Enoch, was born in Carthage on November 8, 1893. Their daughter, Susannah ‘Susie’, was born June 24, 1895. Both the 1900 and 1910 censuses indicate Sarah was the mother of three children, so it is assumed there was either a stillborn child or one who died as an infant.

By the 1900 census, they were living in the town of Carterville where Joseph owned property and operated a grocery store. Joseph’s family was at least partially reunited; both Eva and Leo were living with their father and stepmother along with Arthur, Susannah and Joseph’s Uncle W. R. Keithley. His daughter, Violet, had recently married and was enumerated next door along with her husband and two of his children from a previous marriage. Mabel was living with her adopted family in Wisconsin.

Shortly after the 1900 census, Violet and her husband moved to Kansas, Eva moved to Oklahoma to get married and Leo moved to Oregon. Joseph and Sarah, Arthur and Susannah moved to Joplin where they bought a home on the corner of Connor and 4th Street. The grocery store was about 100 yards from their home just around the corner on 4th Street. [I posted a photo of the store in a blog I wrote about planning a research trip.]

On November 16, 1906, Joseph and Sarah’s daughter Susie died at the age of 11.

Joseph was active in the Methodist Episcopal Church, a member of Woodmen of the World and an active participant in the Retail Merchants Association.

Early in the morning on Valentine’s Day, February 14, 1911, Arthur found his father lying on the floor in the store having had a stroke. He managed to get him back to the house where a doctor was summoned but Joseph was pronounced dead at 7:00 a.m. At the time of his death, Joseph was President of the Retail Merchant’s Association and so several articles regarding his death, funeral and impact on the local businesses were available in the newspaper. Kay wrote a blog in which she included photos of his headstone and one of the newspaper articles. Joseph was buried at the Dudman Springs Cemetery in Sarcoxie (a small community not far from either Joplin or Carterville). He is buried near Susie and his wife, Sarah, who died in 1915.

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This blog was prepared as a part of Amy Johnson Crow’s  No Story Too Small 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge.

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks #18 – Edmund Jean

My 4th great-grandfather by way of my father’s mother’s mother’s mother’s father’s father (makes your head spin, doesn’t it?) was Edmund Jean. That’s a long way back and it is oftentimes difficult to find documentation to support the life of a person who lived in the early years of our country. Fortunately for me, my great-great-grandmother, Martha Ann Jean, married into the Sanford family of Alabama and they have researched that clan reasonably well. Additionally, an attorney from Colorado who was a Jean descendant has researched the Jean line. In both instances, I have been given access to their work.

Edmund’s parents were William Jean and Huldah Brown. He was born about 1755 in Brunswick County, Virginia. According to the U.S. Revolutionary War pension application files of two of his brothers, I know that his father William was an Episcopal minister who lived in Brunswick County until about 1772 when the family moved to Bute County, North Carolina in a section that became Warren County in 1779. Adjacent counties were Stokes, Surry, Guilford and Franklin and members of the Jean family resided in all of them.

About 1776, Edmund married, although we do not have any information on his wife, other than the fact of her existence by way of names of their children. They had nine known children, the first being Wiley who was born about 1777. There was a gap in the ages of their children between 1778 and 1783; this gap could be accounted for by as yet undiscovered or deceased children or perhaps by Edmund’s service in the Revolutionary War.

An 1818 act of Congress established a pension for soldiers who had served during the Revolutionary War and two of Edmund’s brothers applied for pensions. Since Edmund died before that time, he was unable to apply but it seems reasonable and likely to surmise that he did serve and the gap in children may support that supposition.

There is a 1790 census for Guilford County, North Carolina that likely represents Edmund, although the name appears to be Edward; however, there is not an Edward Jean listed within the known children of William and Huldah, and the 1790 census lists as neighbors, William, Sr. (his father), William Jr. (his brother), and Philip (his brother). The family has one male over 16 (which would be Edmund), 5 males under 16 and 5 females (one of which would have been the first wife), which would indicate there is an, as yet, unidentified female child, plus one slave for a total household of 12 people.

Edmund married again on October 2, 1795 to Martha “Patty” Beasley. This marriage leads to a supposition that Edmund’s first wife died, probably in childbirth since David Elroy Jean was born in 1795. Edmund was about 40 years old and Patty about 21 when they married. They had four children, the first of whom was my great-great-great-grandfather, John Jean, born in 1796.

A land transfer record dated December 13, 1797 named Edmund Jean and William Jean as Trustees to oversee one acre of land donated to Love’s Methodist Church. In addition to learning the family moved from Virginia to North Carolina, his brothers’ pension files also mentioned the fact their father was an Episcopal minister and that William was a Methodist minister [some families have Edmund listed as Rev. Edmond Jean but I have not yet found any support for that assertion]. The land transfer record does indicate Edmund was at least active within the church.

The 1800 census for Stokes County, North Carolina enumerates Edmund and his brothers William and Joseph as neighbors. Edmund’s family consisted of four males under 10, two males 10-15, one male between 16 and 25 and Edmund who was over 45 plus 1 female under 10, two females 10-15, one female between 16 and 25 and Patty who was between 26 and 44.

Edmund died in 1802. There seems to have been no will and since he was only about 47 years old, it seems reasonable to assume his death was unexpected. I have as yet found no burial records to indicate where he was interred. It is possible, since he and William were Trustees at Love’s Methodist Church in 1797 that he is buried there.

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This blog was prepared as a part of Amy Johnson Crow’s  No Story Too Small 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge.