52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks #40 – Jacob Lineberry (1770-1852)

My 3rd great-grandfather on my mother’s side was Jacob Lineberry II [or perhaps fourth if you count the two Jacob’s before him who spelled their last name as Leyenberger]. This Jacob was born in Guilford County, North Carolina in about 1770 in the area that would become Randolph County in 1779. While most of his relatives stayed in North Carolina, Jacob moved to what became Carroll County, Virginia, probably sometime between 1790 and 1800 – he was not listed in the 1799 tax rolls for Grayson County, Virginia but was listed for 1800 tax rolls [Carroll County wasn’t formed until 1842].

He married the former Mary Fanning about 1799. Most of the family historians list their marriage as occurring in Randolph County, North Carolina, perhaps due, in part, to the family history written by W.S. Lineberry where he stated “Jacob married and moved to Virginia …” However, land grant records would indicate Mary’s father was already living in Grayson County, Virginia by 1796, which leads me to suspect they may have married in Grayson County rather than Randolph County; no actual records have been located as yet.

The website, New River Notes, has a page with links to ‘Enumerations’ with a transcription of early Grayson County tax lists for a number of years. In 1800, Jacob was listed as Jacob Linbery with tax liability for one male over 21 and one horse. The 1805 land tax list showed Jacob’s tax liability as 154 acres with a value of $50 and a tax liability of 24 cents. The 1810 tax list for Jacob was for one white adult male, zero slaves and two horses. 1813 taxes were again for one white adult male, no slaves, but now four horses for a total liability of 64 cents. 1817 was for the same one adult and four horses with a tax liability of 72 cents. The 1824 assessment indicated Jacob and Mary’s oldest son, Francis, was living and taxed on his own with one horse, while Jacob’s assessment was for three adult white males and three horses – a total tax liability of 36 cents. By 1835, Jacob and all his sons were living in separate, taxable, households or taxed in Jacob’s household: two adult males and two horses for 12 cents.

The 1820 census lists tick marks for two adults plus five males and six females under 25. One of the six females [age between 16 and 25] is not accounted for in the known names of their children. Their known children were: Francis (1801), Catherine (1803), Jacob P. and George (about 1806), Joseph (1807), Elizabeth (1809), Martha ‘Patsy’ (1812), Mary (1814), Lurana Susany (1815), Jeremiah (1817) and Euphama (1820). 1820Each of the census records indicates Jacob and Mary were born in different decades. The 1830 census record lists a female child born between 1825 and 1830; if Mary were born nearer the 1780 year, it is possible this could be their daughter, although it is also possible she could be a granddaughter or even a neighbor or other relative. 1830The 1840 census has tick marks for Jacob and Mary and their youngest son, Jeremiah. Jeremiah married in 1845, but the 1850 census lists both Jacob and Jeremiah as widowed and, three-year-old Mary, one of Jeremiah’s daughters living in the household.

Jacob died in Carroll County, Virginia on January 17, 1852 and is buried in the Old Fanning Cemetery. LINEBERRY Jacob HS @ Fanning Frost Cemetery 1871-1852

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This blog was prepared as a part of Amy Johnson Crow’s  No Story Too Small 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge.

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52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks #39 – Mary Fanning

My 3rd great-grandmother was Mary Fanning Lineberry, daughter of John Fanning, Sr. and Elizabeth Ann Lipps. She was born about 1771 in North Carolina and died about 1846 in Carroll County, Virginia.

Little is known of her other than her name and general years of her birth and death. This is quite typical of a woman’s life in the time period prior to the 1850 census when they could at least have their name written on a census but since she died about 1846 she was never recorded on a census.

She married Jacob Lineberry IV, probably in Grayson County, Virginia, about 1800. She and Jacob had at least eleven children: Francis (1801), Catherine (1803), Jacob P. [my 2nd great-grandfather] (1805), George (1806),  Joseph (1807), Elizabeth (1809), Martha ‘Patsy’ (1812), Mary ‘Polly’ (1814), Lurana (1815), Jeremiah (1817), and Euphamia (1820).

When her father died in about 1813, she inherited a share of her father’s land grant. The property was originally in Grayson County but was in the area that became Carroll County in 1842 when county borders were realigned. Jacob purchased the remainder of the land from her brothers and she and Jacob lived there from about 1813 for the rest of their lives. Both her father and her husband are buried on the land so it seems likely that she and her mother are buried there as well.

 

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This blog was prepared as a part of Amy Johnson Crow’s  No Story Too Small 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge.

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks #24 – Delila Davis Harmon

One of my four second great-grandmothers on my mother’s side was Delila Davis Harmon. Delila was one of eight known children of Morris and Sarah McCane Davis born about 1820 in Grayson County Virginia. She married Thomas Benjamin Harmon in Grayson County on August 23, 1838. It’s oftentimes difficult to determine maiden names of women this early in our country’s history but Martha Fontaine Patterson uploaded on Delila’s FindAGrave memorial a copy of the permission to marry signed by her father [I provided a link to the page with the permission and marriage bond in my blog for Thomas].Davis PermissionI have spelled her name in this blog as Delila but there is often no consistency in early records in the way a name was spelled. Many of the people who recorded events listed names as they heard them; additionally, people often went by nicknames and used them in official documents. Her name in the marriage permission document above is Delila but the 1850 census listed her as Lila while the 1870 census spelled her name Delilah and the 1880 census spelled it Delila. The 1860 census has not yet been found. The 1850 ‘Lila’ was apparently what she was called; in fact, with the propensity for people in the South to pronounce the ending ‘a’ with a ‘y’ sound, she may have been called Liley (with a long I sound) or perhaps Lillie.

Delila and Thomas had eleven known children [censuses were recorded every ten years and provide one of the best listings of the children in a family; however, birth records were scanty and children may well have been born and died during the decade between censuses and consequently missed]. My great-grandmother, Rhoda Harmon Lineberry, appears to have been their 5th child. Because I named the children in the blog about her husband, I won’t list them again.

Delila died at about 68 years of age on November 5, 1888 in Hillsville, Virginia. The listed cause of death was dropsy, an old term for edema, which could have been a symptom of several health issues, including heart failure. She was buried in the Melton Cemetery in the Mount Zion Community of Carroll County; there is a FindAGrave memorial for her with some details and a photo of her headstone as well as the marriage permission and bond.

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This blog was prepared as a part of Amy Johnson Crow’s  No Story Too Small 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge.

 

 

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks #20 – Piety Thomas Smith

Piety Thomas Smith was my maternal 2nd great-grandmother. Piety was born December 9, 1810 in North Carolina. She married Jacob P. Lineberry in Grayson County, Virginia sometime after her marriage bond was recorded on November 4, 1833. Although many researchers list her parents as Wyatt Tansel Smith and Elizabeth Wilkes, Jacob’s marriage bond listed her as the daughter of P. Thomas Smith, although I suppose this could be an erroneous reiteration of her name rather than including the name of her father.

The 1840 Grayson County census for Jacob Lineberry listed one adult male between the ages of 20 and 29 and one adult female between the ages of 30 and 39 plus two male and two female children five years of age – Catherine (1835), Elizabeth (1837), Allen Journal (1838) and Joseph (1840). It is assumed the census enumerator erred in marking the age for Jacob since he was born in 1806 and would have been 34 at the time of the 1840 census, while Piety would have been 30.

The 1850 census lists another five children born to Jacob and Piety during the decade from 1840 to 1850 – Mary (1841), George [my great-grandfather] (1843), Wesley Bird (1845), Jacob (1846) and Martha (1847). Although the specific birth dates we have for Jacob and Martha are as above, the census enumerations for both 1850 and 1860 list Jacob and Martha reversed in age, which means Jacob’s recorded birth date is likely incorrect. 1850 M432_939 Page 378A Jacob & Piety Lineberry (2)The 1860 census adds one more daughter during the decade between 1850 and 1860 – Piety (1856). They also had a son Isiah born in 1850 who died in 1851. Daughters Catherine and Elizabeth both married about 1855 and by the 1860 census, Piety and Jacob were grandparents to four grandsons.

During the Civil War, two of their sons, George and Wesley served in the 29th Virginia Infantry for the duration while Allen Journal served ten days in the Virginia Militia as a part of the Confederate Army. All three sons survived the war.

By the 1870 census, only the youngest daughter, Piety, still lived at home. All the other children were married and raising families. Piety married in 1873. By the 1880 census, Piety and Jacob were enumerated as a couple.

By the time Piety died on October 25, 1885, she and Jacob had 80 grandchildren. Another 20 were born after her death for a total of 100 grandchildren.

IMG_0952 - Piety Thomas Smith Lineberry's HSShe was buried at the Hebron Cemetery in Carroll County, Virginia. Her hand-carved tombstone lists her birth and death dates as well as an inscription, likely carved by Jacob [a close-up photo of the text was posted by Beth Robinette on the FindAGrave memorial]:

As you pass by remember me
As you are now
So once was I
As I am now
You soon will be
Prepare for death and follow me – See more at: http://kbaumantreehouse.name/getperson.php?personID=I296&tree=keithandkay#sthash.yVf4oDnm.dpuf

 As you pass by remember me
As you are now
So once was I
As I am now
You soon will be
Prepare for death and follow

As you pass by remember me
As you are now
So once was I
As I am now
You soon will be
Prepare for death and follow me – See more at: http://kbaumantreehouse.name/getperson.php?personID=I296&tree=keithandkay#sthash.yVf4oDnm.dpuf

 

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This blog was prepared as a part of Amy Johnson Crow’s  No Story Too Small 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge.

 

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks #16 – George Alex Lineberry

Lineberry George AlexMy mother’s grandfather was George Alex Lineberry (making him my great-grandfather). He was the 6th child/3rd son of Jacob P. and Piety Thomas Smith Lineberry, born February 3, 1844 in Grayson County, Virginia. Although my mother and her brothers moved to Virginia in February of 1922, she didn’t get to meet her grandfather because he had died six years  before she arrived.

The 1850 census, though not a very clear image, does reveal something about families in that time period. His parents married in November 1833 and had their first child in February 1835 and over the next 15 years had another child every year or two. 1850 censusTo clarify, his siblings were Catherine, Elizabeth, Allen, Joseph, Mary, Wesley, Martha, and Jacob. Only one more child was added in the 1860 census – Piety, born in 1856.

By 1861 and 1862 the country was facing a looming war between the states and George enlisted in Company F of the Virginia 29th Infantry on April 3, 1862 in the small community of Saltville. Saltville was an important strategic area because of the railway lines and because of the salt mines that were crucial for supply provisions for the Confederate Army (1). Saltville was about 70 miles northwest of George’s Carroll County community through the higher elevations of the Blue Ridge Mountains. George’s cousin, Orin A. Lineberry, must have made the trip with him because he also enlisted at Saltville on April 3, 1862. His brother, Wesley, enlisted in the same unit, but in Carroll County, on February 13, 1863 and his cousin, Joseph (Orin’s brother), enlisted on February 21, 1863, also in Carroll County. The Virginia 29th engaged in many battles throughout the years of the war; a list of the battles can be seen at http://www.geni.com/projects/29th-Virginia-Infantry-CSA-US-Civil-War-Project/4334. On our trip to Virginia this past summer, Kay and I stopped at the Appomattox Courthouse, which was the location of the signing of the documents that ended the Civil War – one of the battles listed for the Virginia 29th was Appomattox Courthouse. Some of the stories told about George’s experiences during the war were related in an audio recording made by my Uncle Leonard and written up by my daughter on a blog she called “The Wool Overcoat & Trying Times.”

A couple of years after the war George married Rhoda Harmon on February 26, 1867 in Carroll County, Virginia. The 1870 census lists George and Rhoda and their first child, Leander Francis, who was eight months old at the time of that June 1, 1860 record. George was listed as a farmer on property valued at $120, although he likely also participated in the family’s iron forge business.

By the 1880 census, George and Rhoda had added several more children, including my grandfather, Jacob, and their daughter, Piety Catherine, who provided a home for my mother from 1922 until 1929, following the deaths of both my mother’s parents. George was still listed as a farmer.1880 census

George and Rhoda were enumerated as living next to George’s parents in the 1880 census. His mother died in 1885 and his father in 1887. According to letters written by my grandfather to his brother, Leander, from 1894 through the beginning of 1915, the George Lineberry household was not one of peace and tranquility. In those letters, we learn of the death of George’s wife, Rhoda, and of his subsequent marriage to the former Amanda Thompson. George was 52 and Amanda was 22. There is some indication in Jacob’s letters that Amanda may have been George’s son Alex’s girlfriend, which, along with George’s abusive words and behavior, caused a good bit of ongoing animosity between George and Alex.

George and Amanda began their own family and the 1900 census enumeration shows them: 1900 censusLillie and Alexander are Rhoda’s children. Although Amanda stated she was the mother of three children, all living, and three children are listed (Calla B., Robert and Burton), Calla was born in 1894 while Rhoda was still alive and three years before her marriage to George.

The 1910 census doesn’t shed much light on the question of Calla:1910 censusThere are five children listed: Robert E., Burton L., Rudy R., Benjamin G. and Roby P. Calla is not listed although she should only have been about 15. Amanda is listed as the mother of six children of which only five are still living. However, a marriage record for Callie stating she is the daughter of George Lineberry and Amanda Thompson was recorded in Carroll County in 1911 and she did not die until 1989. Since George and Rhoda already had a daughter named Callie born in 1881, it doesn’t seem likely they would name another daughter Calla/Callie born to them in 1894 while the original Callie was still living. The question then is, who were the parents of Calla Bell Lineberry and which child of George and Amanda died between 1900 and 1910? The 1920 census – taken four years after George’s death – lists one more child: Luria. That makes a grand total of 17 or 18 children for George.

A family reunion photo shows a small portion of what that kind of family looked like. As best as we can reconstruct, neither Amanda nor any of her children are in this photo. George is on the back row just to the right of center.georgesfamily

George died of pneumonia on January 18, 1916. He is buried at the Alex Lineberry Cemetery on the family farmlands just above Crooked Creek with headstones of both his wives nearby.

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(1) http://www.encyclopediavirginia.org/Saltville_During_the_Civil_War. Included on that website is an image of an early drawing of the Saltville railroad and mines that first appeared in 1865 in Harper’s Weekly. A number of other Saltville articles and drawings can be seen at http://www.sonofthesouth.net/leefoundation/civil-war/1865/january/saltville-virginia.htm

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This blog was prepared as a part of Amy Johnson Crow’s  No Story Too Small 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge.

 

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks # 14 – Jacob P. Lineberry

Jacob P. Lineberry was my great-great-grandfather on my mother’s side. Jacob was actually the fifth known generation of sons named Jacob, although the original last name was Leyenberger. My great-grandfather’s name was George, but my grandfather also bore the name of Jacob Lineberry.

He was born in Grayson County, Virginia in about 1806 to Jacob Lineberry and Mary Elizabeth Fanning and married Piety Thomas Smith in Grayson County on November 4, 1833. There is a photocopy of their marriage bond attached to Jacob’s profile on FindAGrave.

Carroll County, Virginia was established from the eastern portion of Grayson County in 1842 and Jacob and Piety appear on the 1850 Carroll County census lists. That census page is very faint and difficult to read so I will provide a transcription:

Jacob Lineberry, 39, farmer, born in Virginia, can read and write
Piety Lineberry, 40, born in North Carolina, cannot write
Catherine Lineberry, 15, born in Virginia
Elizabeth Lineberry, 14, born in Virginia
Allen Lineberry, 11, born in Virginia
Joseph Lineberry, 9, born in Virginia
Mary Lineberry, 7, born in Virginia
George Lineberry, 5, born in Virginia
Wesley Lineberry, 3, born in Virginia
Martha Lineberry, 2, born in Virginia
Jacob Lineberry, 1, born in Virginia

The 1860 census adds one more child: Piety who was born in 1856. They also had a son named Isiah who was born about 1850 and died in infancy.1860Jacob is still listed as a farmer with property valued at $500 and personal property valued at $440.

The 1870 census lists Jacob not as a farmer, but as a hammerer of iron. The Lineberry family had been operating an iron forge for many years on Crooked Creek and this is the only census record that indicates that family occupation. 1870My daughter Kay has written about the Old Iron Forge, including a transcription of a tape of my Uncle Leonard talking about the forge. When we were in Galax this past summer we took photographs of the hammers that were found and placed in the Harmon Museum.IMG_0821By the time of the 1880 census, all Jacob and Piety’s children were married and raising their own families, all but Wesley and Elizabeth still living on the mountains they’d spent their lives on and Jacob was once again listed as a farmer.

Jacob was widowed in October 1885 and he died May 13, 1887. Jacob and Piety are buried at the Hebron Cemetery in Carroll County. Jacob Lineberry 1806-1887 FAG HS

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This blog was prepared as a part of Amy Johnson Crow’s  No Story Too Small 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge.

 

52 Ancestors #4 – Rhoda Harmon Lineberry

Harmon, Rhoda LineberryMy great-grandmother, Rhoda Harmon Lineberry, was one of eleven known children and the fifth daughter of Thomas Benjamin Harmon and Delilah Davis born about 1843 probably in Grayson County, Virginia, although her marriage record states she was born in Carroll County [her father was born and died in Grayson County so it would be a reasonable assumption they were living there at the time of her birth].

We don’t know very much about Rhoda. We don’t know her birth date, just three censuses that indicate she was born about 1842 or 1843. There is a marriage record indicating she married George Alex Lineberry on February 26, 1867 in Carroll County, Virginia at the age of 21, which would place her birth in 1846. Since she was listed as 6 on the 1850 census and had two younger siblings, the 1843 date is probably reasonable. The census records also indicate that, like many women, Rhoda could read but not write.

George and his family had an iron forge they operated on Crooked Creek as well as farmed the land on the hills that overlooked the creek. My daughter and I took a trip back to Carroll County in May 2013 and walked part of the family’s land; it was a misty, overcast day, but I was able to take a zoomed-in picture of Crooked Creek below their farm land.IMG_0855 A death record indicates their first child, a daughter named Nancy, was born January 15, 1868 and died January 31, 1868, having lived sixteen days. By the 1870 census, George and Rhoda had a second child, son Leander Francis born in 1869. Four more children were born between 1870 and 1880: my grandfather, Jacob Wesley in 1871, Dillie Viola in 1873, Thomas Allen in 1875 and Piety Catherine in 1878. Another death record identifies an unnamed child was born and died September 8, 1872.

The next few years brought more children:  Callie Dora in 1881, Linnie Ann in 1883, and George Alexander in 1885 – ten children in all. The majority of the 1890 census was destroyed by fire so there is no record listing Rhoda with these children.

My grandfather, Jacob, left home about 1894 and moved to Missouri joining other Lineberry and Harmon relatives who had moved there sometime after the Civil War. His letters back home to his brother, Leander, indicated he had left home because their home was not a very happy place and left no doubt the cause of the unhappiness was his father, George. He did, on the other hand, mention his mother in very positive terms. Kay wrote a story of Jacob’s obvious love for his mother and his grief upon learning of her death in her blog, Such a Good Mother.

Records indicate Rhoda had inherited some land from her father and upon her death on January 31, 1896 at the age of 53, that property was divided among her children. My grandfather was the only one of her children who did not remain on the land. Rhoda was buried on the family land in what is known as the Alex Lineberry Cemetery between her husband, George, and his second wife, Amanda Thompson Lineberry, and surrounded by several of their children and their spouses. IMG_0842_________________

This blog was prepared as a part of Amy Johnson Crow’s  No Story Too Small 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge.